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Jason

In 2017, people are more engaged with video than ever before. Content might be king, but video is the king’s hand.

Visual Content Is Up

You want someone to read your tweets? Include a visual.

Across the board, posts that have images or video just perform better. It’s why Twitter and Facebook not only let you add an image, they often auto populate the main image from your shared article into the post.

And users can’t get enough. According to Hubspot, 43% of users want more video, and marketers say it has the best ROI.

Businesses Are Catching On

According to Vidyard, 85% of businesses have staff and resources for producing video. And those videos serve a wide range of industries and purposes. Technology and manufacturing companies produce the most videos, which makes sense considering that most videos are demos, tutorials, and testimonials.

At Sandstorm®, our creative team has experience in video creation, and we’ve created video for several of our clients.

Keep It Short and Sweet

Attention spans aren’t getting any longer—at least according to a study from Microsoft that says our attention spans are shorter than a goldfish—so there’s no need to make lengthy videos. Most videos should be less than 3 minutes—with the exception of product demos, which can be longer. Nobody’s cozying up with popcorn to watch your video; they want to see it and move on to the next.

Could a video be right for your company? It all depends on your brand and your audience, but video can be a simple way to easily and quickly introduce your company, products, services, or even highlight your culture. Let us help you tell your brand story through video.

This blog was posted by Jason on August 25, 2017.
Jason Dabrowski

About the Author

Jason Dabrowski

Jason is one of Sandstorm’s designers and also helps keep the office running smoothly. As a veteran of the theatre—from acting to directing, lighting to set design—he knows the value of hard work and a positive attitude. Look for his unique voice on the blog.

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Jason
How to make your website more inclusive by design

If your website was a physical location, would you build it without access for people with disabilities?

Of course not. You’re not a heartless monster.

But a surprising number of websites forget about the needs of people with disabilities. Inclusive design seeks to change that.

The principle behind inclusive design is creating products and services that everyone can use. Not only does that provide accessibility to your website for people with disabilities, it creates a better experience for all of your users.

Color contrast is a big part of inclusive design and web accessibility. As one of the most important tools in our utility belt, color choice is a big part of a designer’s work. We use it for emotive and illustrative purposes. Red, for example, can be a great color to highlight importance and urgency. Contrasting it with white type can help draw the eye, and that color combination is great for getting users to address alerts.

So what happens when a user has difficulty seeing the color red?

Well, it turns out that white text on a red background is completely invisible to people with color blindness—something we discovered during one of our usability studies. In fact, there are a number of color combinations that cause problems for the visually impaired.

Luckily, there are organizations like World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) to create standards for accessibility issues like color contrast. In fact, W3C went so far as to establish extensive Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, and the web community responded by developing tools that help designers create more inclusive sites.

Some of those tools, like WebAIM and Colorable, focus specifically on color contrast. To meet WCAG, normal, non-bolded text should have a contrast ratio of at least 4.5:1; for large text it should be at least 3:1.

What else can you do to start making sure your website is more accessible and inclusive?

1. Add Alternative Text to Images

“Alt text” is essential to web accessibility. Assistive technology, such as screen readers, relies on alt text to turn images into braille or speech for the impaired.

Most content management systems, like Drupal or Kentico, include an alt tag field for images. Start with your company logo, then add descriptive alt text for each image on your site.

2. Use the Right Heading Structure

Correctly ordering the HTML headings on each page makes it much easier for screen readers and the visually impaired to navigate your site. While design considerations might require this order to shift, try to follow it where you can. At the very least, make your page title and h1 consistent—it’ll help the people using screen readers to make sense of the content.

3. Stop Using “Click Here”

For many reasons, please stop using “click here” as link text. Not only does it make content seem outdated, “click here” is a vague and confusing link description for people who use screen readers. Instead, use strong verbs that tell users what you want them to do and what they get in return:

  • Register for the event
  • Request more information
  • Download this report

4. Utilize Free Web Evaluation Tools

In addition to color contrast tools, enterprising developers have created lots of free tools that evaluate your website’s accessibility.

WAVE, for example, provides a breakdown of errors, alerts, and features in a list form and a visual overlay so you can identify opportunities to improve your site.

Web accessibility isn’t a cut-and-dried, check-it-off-the-list process. But when you design with all of your users in mind, you make your website a more inclusive place to be. And who doesn’t want to be a part of that?

This blog was posted by Jason on August 2, 2017.
Jason Dabrowski

About the Author

Jason Dabrowski

Jason is one of Sandstorm’s designers and also helps keep the office running smoothly. As a veteran of the theatre—from acting to directing, lighting to set design—he knows the value of hard work and a positive attitude. Look for his unique voice on the blog.

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Jason

For awhile there, in the land of web design, it seemed that sans serif fonts were taking over. Arial, Verdana, Geneva, and even san-serif itself. Google got in on the action too, ditching its long time faith in serif fonts for its new logo a few years back.


 

Serif fonts have come back into vogue. Errol Morris, filmmaker and author, ran an experiment in the New York Times in 2012. Readers thought they were merely reading an essay and deciding whether or not they agreed with a statement about security. This was, supposedly, to tell whether they were optimists or pessimists, however Morris was actually testing something else. He was testing fonts. He chose several serif and sans-serif fonts to see if readers showed a favoritism toward any type of font. Which font was more convincing? Baskerville, a serif font, won hands down.

I’m guessing one study from 4 years ago isn’t enough to get you back on the serif train. Well, just this year, another serif font Times New Roman, was voted “most trusted typeface” by UK company, solopress, following a survey of 1,000 people (Comic Sans came in second place, so no survey is perfect).
 

That’s not all, though. The US National Library of Medicine, the Centers for Disease Control, as well as others in the crossroads between government and medicine recommend a serif font: “Serif fonts are usually easier to read than sans-serif fonts. This is because the serif makes the individual letters more distinctive and easier for our brains to recognize quickly” (PDF).


A few google searches will show you that serif fonts have a reputation for readability, but also for conveying nostalgia and authority.

One of our recent clients, Vibrant (Formerly DHCU) came to us with a rebrand. For this client, we needed a way to merge the fun and friendly atmosphere of their business, while not undermining the trust and reliability you’d expect from a financial institution. Our solution was a mix of exciting and engaging color for their brand married with a serif font for their logo to keep their brand grounded in the financial world.

 

 

If your website could use a new look, or you're looking to build trust and confidence with your brand, Sandstorm can help.

 

Now get your serif on (go ‘head, be gone with it).

This blog was posted by Jason on January 27, 2017.
Jason Dabrowski

About the Author

Jason Dabrowski

Jason is one of Sandstorm’s designers and also helps keep the office running smoothly. As a veteran of the theatre—from acting to directing, lighting to set design—he knows the value of hard work and a positive attitude. Look for his unique voice on the blog.

Jason
Michael Hartman, Sandstorm's Executive Experience Director

When Michael Hartman came to Sandstorm 5 years ago, he brought with him a wealth of experience in Drupal and user experience design. Since then he’s guided our team of UX experts every day while bringing expert knowledge to our clients (and to our blog).

As our Executive Experience Director, Michael will continue to provide thought leadership and strategy. He’ll be expanding UX strategy while cultivating superior processes and standards. All the while Michael will educate clients, mentor Sandstormers, and keep our agency moving forward technologically through development and user experience design.

Congratulations, Michael. Rock on!

This blog was posted by Jason on November 4, 2015.
Jason Dabrowski

About the Author

Jason Dabrowski

Jason is one of Sandstorm’s designers and also helps keep the office running smoothly. As a veteran of the theatre—from acting to directing, lighting to set design—he knows the value of hard work and a positive attitude. Look for his unique voice on the blog.

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Jason
Welcome New Digital Strategist, Lisa Goepfrich

Lisa Goepfrich is our latest addition to the team. She hails from South Bend, Indiana and is ecstatic to dive into the role of digital strategist here at Sandstorm.

As a graduate of Notre Dame with a degree in Film and Television, Lisa’s former life was naturally in video production. She is extraordinarily adept at building visual stories and will bring this expertise to the larger world of user experience. With video being one of the growing forms of connecting with a user, Lisa will ensure our clients can build extraordinary brand experiences.

Lisa is enthusiastic, and feels that Sandstorm’s core values, especially warrior spirit, are refreshing and motivating. Also, just like a lot of Sandstormers she’s got fuzzy four-legged pals, Louie and Bailey. The pups are always waiting for Lisa to come home so they can all watch some gridiron matchups after work!

Welcome aboard!

This blog was posted by Jason on September 10, 2015.
Jason Dabrowski

About the Author

Jason Dabrowski

Jason is one of Sandstorm’s designers and also helps keep the office running smoothly. As a veteran of the theatre—from acting to directing, lighting to set design—he knows the value of hard work and a positive attitude. Look for his unique voice on the blog.

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Jason
Andy Cullen, Senior Engineer and Team Lead

Senior Web Developer Andy Cullen is expanding his role into Senior Engineer and Team Lead. In a position that is new for both Andy and Sandstorm, he’ll mentor our junior and mid-level developers as well as provide direction for the team for Drupal web development projects and beyond. Andy will make sure they have the support they need while helping them grow into larger projects and responsibilities.

Andy will also coordinate with our strategy team to provide valuable insight for clients, all the while keeping our projects rolling with the quality and cool determination he’s known for here at Sandstorm.

Congrats, Andy!

This blog was posted by Jason on August 6, 2015.
Jason Dabrowski

About the Author

Jason Dabrowski

Jason is one of Sandstorm’s designers and also helps keep the office running smoothly. As a veteran of the theatre—from acting to directing, lighting to set design—he knows the value of hard work and a positive attitude. Look for his unique voice on the blog.

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Jason
Laura Luckman Kelber, Sandstorm’s Chief Strategy Officer

Sandstorm’s Strategy Director, Laura Luckman Kelber is trailblazing her way into a new role.

As our Chief Strategy Officer, Laura is integral to our continued growth, making sure we provide thoughtful, holistic solutions to our clients. She will continue to help our clients grow through innovative marketing and brand strategy, as well as lead her team of strategists to elevate our clients’ businesses with strategic insights and proactive marketing solutions. And she’ll be doing it all with her signature style, wit, empathy, and infectiously motivational energy.

Congrats, Laura! Daniel, Spike, and Sugar must be quite proud.

This blog was posted by Jason on July 8, 2015.
Jason Dabrowski

About the Author

Jason Dabrowski

Jason is one of Sandstorm’s designers and also helps keep the office running smoothly. As a veteran of the theatre—from acting to directing, lighting to set design—he knows the value of hard work and a positive attitude. Look for his unique voice on the blog.

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Jason
Drupal Development Firm Hires Outstanding Senior System Architect

We’re super excited to introduce our new Senior System Architect, Sean Fuller. Sean has nearly 2 decades of web development, agency, and Drupal development experience. He's worked on projects for brands in a variety of verticals: insurance, beverages, fast food, animal welfare, chemicals, transportation, nonprofit, publications, and early childhood education. (Whew, that’s a lot!)

As a Senior System Architect, Sean will be a hands-on application and Drupal web developer as well as the technical lead on projects. He will work with design and strategy teams from kick off through launch; to plan, design and execute technical solutions for client projects.

Sean just recently re-entered a carnivorous lifestyle after 22 years of being a vegetarian. In 2015, he and his wife, Rachel, have trips planned to Panama, El Salvador, and Ireland. Their cat, Missy Elliecat, will have to stay home.

This blog was posted by Jason on January 14, 2015.
Jason Dabrowski

About the Author

Jason Dabrowski

Jason is one of Sandstorm’s designers and also helps keep the office running smoothly. As a veteran of the theatre—from acting to directing, lighting to set design—he knows the value of hard work and a positive attitude. Look for his unique voice on the blog.

Jason
Learning and Sharing Drupal

I am quite proud (and excited) about our constant opportunities for employee learning and sharing here at Sandstorm. It’s even one of our core values. Having worked at other companies, learning and sharing are things that are in the “whenever we have time” category, which often translates into, well, NEVER.

In the past year, my Drupal expertise has grown exponentially thanks to AndyAndrew, and Will. I already considered myself Drupal-savvy, but I was introduced to new ways to author complex code when the editor “fixes” things that aren’t broken. Drew recently introduced me to posting a new and different kind of content, Events, and how it’s subtly different from other kinds of content that I’ve worked on before.

In addition to Drupal web development and administrative skills, we regularly have meetings where Sandy herself shares with us company overview information, such as how we’re doing year over year (spoiler, we’re doing awesome!) as well as new business or new client wins. For other companies this sort of information would be considered “unnecessary” for everyone outside the C-suite, but at Sandstorm there is a sense of trust, openness, and responsibility. It’s helpful and instructive to know where the ship is headed, not just that I’ve been rowing as fast as a I can. Understanding the work that’s happening outside of my tasks may not be directly applicable to my day to day, but it often makes things clearer and easier to understand, especially when things change.

This blog was posted by Jason on December 22, 2014.
Jason Dabrowski

About the Author

Jason Dabrowski

Jason is one of Sandstorm’s designers and also helps keep the office running smoothly. As a veteran of the theatre—from acting to directing, lighting to set design—he knows the value of hard work and a positive attitude. Look for his unique voice on the blog.

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Jason
The Warrior Spirit, One Core Value of A Successful Digital Marketing Firm

One of the unique things that I am most proud of as a Sandstormer is our warrior spirit. This is not the kind of company where people say “that’s not my job”. It’s the kind of company where people say “what can I do to help?”

One day I came back into the office from using the restroom to find several people in the kitchen pulling together garbage bags and spraying Lysol. I found out that the garbage smelled funny, and 4 people just got up from their desks and started handling the situation. I asked if I could help, as the de facto “Office Manager” this is sorta my responsibility, but I was assured that it was all good.

At just about any other company, someone would send an angry email to someone like me, or there’d be someone elected to add this task to my plate. At Sandstorm, when the garbage needs to go out, it just gets done.

It was the same the day Janna and Laura brought in a Kia-load of things from IKEA. A group of us just made our way down to the loading dock, and pulled everything into the freight elevator. We brought it up and pretty much the whole office started pulling apart boxes and assembling things.

It extends beyond garbage detail and putting together Swedish furniture. Our wonderful Digital Strategists keep an eye on our workload and there have been many busy days where I come to find out a few large chunks of my project work has been handed off to someone else. Similarly there are those days where a project shows up end of day, or a simple project grows 6 heads right before it’s due, and folks spring into action to help each other out. Similarly, it’s not unusual for someone with a light day to simply come forward during our morning meeting and say they have time to help today, or in the middle of the day to start asking around to see if anyone needs any other help.

It’s the kind of team spirit that makes you WANT to help others, because you know they will be there when you need help next. It also inspires a certain level of self-reliance, at least in me, because I know everyone is busy, much of the time, so I only want to raise my hand when I need it. I’m proud to work for a digital marketing firm where “nobody gets left behind on the battlefield” and I can’t wait for the challenges of the New Year!

This blog was posted by Jason on December 10, 2014.
Jason Dabrowski

About the Author

Jason Dabrowski

Jason is one of Sandstorm’s designers and also helps keep the office running smoothly. As a veteran of the theatre—from acting to directing, lighting to set design—he knows the value of hard work and a positive attitude. Look for his unique voice on the blog.

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